Wine Wednesday – oops, I drank it again so let’s talk about proper storage!

Hello!

Guess what day it is?!

karen wine gif

Whoop!

So, I have a confession and no, it’s not just the wine talking.

I bought, tasted, and enjoyed a wine I’ve already reviewed.

Oops.

In my defense, it was a year ago that I reviewed it. How was I supposed to remember? I was DRINKING WINE!

In its defense, it was totally worth drinking again. πŸ™‚

You guys know how much I love the Middle Sister wines. ❀

I saw one I hadn’t seen in a while – apparently, a year ago in a whole different state – and decided to grab it.

The Rebel Red!

image

 

I can neither confirm nor deny that I originally grabbed this bottle based on the fact that she’s a bad ass redhead and I felt like I was looking in the mirror. πŸ˜‰

Regardless of my reasoning, it’s a pretty damn fine wine and definitely worth sharing.

I won’t review it again because, well, I don’t want to bore you and I agree with what I said the last time I drank it! YUM!

So, let’s talk a minute about proper wine storage and serving temperatures.

Ideally, if you really plan on getting in to wine and drinking some really good (and sometimes expensive) bottles, you should have a wine cellar. Storage temperature is very important when it comes to keeping good wine and preventing them from turning, which is fancy speak for going bad and tasting like crap.

If you have the moolah to go all out and build one in your home, my birthday happens to be coming up and that’s been on my wishlist for quite some time now, pleaseandthankyouforsharingyourwealth. πŸ™‚

Pretty sure angels sing inside here.....

Pretty sure angels sing inside here…..

However, if you are mere mortals as we are, you can buy a small wine refrigerator (cellar) at a pretty reasonable price from most home improvement stores. They come in all shapes, sizes, and bottle capacity.

baby cellar

small cellar

big cellar

Wine Spectator has a great article on how to properly store wine. I’ll give you the basic rundown.

1. As I said, temperature is important. You want to keep the wine cool. If you’re like me and you wait until the last possible minute in the spring/early summer to turn your a/c on, if you don’t have your wine properly stored, you could “cook” it in the bottle all under the pretense of trying to save some dough. Except, you’d be out the money you spent on that wine because now it tastes flat and blech. Temperatures above 70 are no-nos.

2. But, too cold is no bueno, too! How many of you keep your wine in the refrigerator? Bad, bad idea. The cork could dry out and air could get into the bottle and then your expensive Chardonnay is going to need to be dumped down the sink. Boo hiss. Now, don’t get me wrong, if you just bought a bottle and it’s room temperature, put it in the fridge or even the freezer for a few to cool it down. I even do that with red wines – warm wine is fine but the flavors come through so much better when a red is served between 56-60 degrees. Seriously.

3. Steady temps are the best. You just want to try to avoid too many temperature changes. Wine is meant to be enjoyed, not spit out on to the floor because it’s been ruined. If you need to spit, the sink is the place to run to. If you’re at a restaurant? Um….your call.

4. Turn out the lights … or the party’s over! Those bottles may look thick and dark but they can only withstand straight sunlight for so long. If you don’t have a wine cellar or refrigerator, find the coolest, darkest place in your house (you might even find your potatoes stored there!) and stash your bottles there.

5. Humidity is a delicate balance. Generally, basic storage in your home won’t give you any humidity issues. But, if you plan on being a wine collector or saving an expensive bottle for an upcoming special occasion (like 10 years from now), you probably want to invest in a device that will do the job for you and maintain proper humidity and prevent the cork from drying out or, even worse, getting moldy from too much moisture! YUCK!

6. Sideways. Did you ever read that book or see the movie? The book was SO much better than the movie!! Anyway, I know you find bottle standing upright when you go to the store but you should really try to store the bottles on their side, ideally angled slightly cork side down. This helps to prevent the cork from drying out (have you ever had a cork break on you while you were trying to open the bottle? SO FRUSTRATING! And very difficult to get the pieces of cork out of your wine.) – makes sense since the wine is up against it .

7.Β Vibrations are only good if you’re the Beach Boys. Basically, you want to keep your wine as still as possible. Now, unless you live with a herd of elephants or on an aircraft carrier, I’m pretty sure you’ve got the right storage conditions to prevent a ton of jostling around. Wine makers take great, even painstaking care, when crafting their wines. Would be a shame to store a bottle of Opus OneΒ on top of the pinsetter at the bowling center. #justsayin

So, now you’re all prepared! If I come over and I find a bottle of Rombauer Chardonnay languishing in your refrigerator or a bottle of Gary Farrell Pinot NoirΒ sitting in the sun on your kitchen window ledge, we will have words. Fisticuffs may be one of them. πŸ˜‰

Talk to me: Did you know there were so many rules? Do you like wine enough to even care? Have you ever had wine out of a box? (I have! Don’t knock it ’til you try it! They’ve come a loooong way.)

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2 thoughts on “Wine Wednesday – oops, I drank it again so let’s talk about proper storage!

  1. My wine education sucks πŸ™‚ Enjoyed your post for that very reason, thanks!
    Boxed wine is associated with my college days in my mind and that bond can not be broken. Even if a boxed wine is good, it will always remind me of the cheapest warm red consumed excessively by me and my buddies in a dorm room. Doesn’t mean I hate it – I just haven’t had it since college πŸ™‚

  2. Pingback: Wine Wednesday – 2012 Bonterra Viognier | A Hungry Runner

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